Posts Tagged ‘Online safety’

Maintain a Healthy Skepticism Online

There are constant variations on how cyber thieves are trying to access and exploit the confidential information of people innocently maneuvering the web.  It makes sense to be skeptical of any e-mail, posted link, private message or inquiry.  Cyber thieves aim to gain your trust and get you to let your guard down.  This allows them to place spyware and malware onto your computer, learn important data about you that lets them access your accounts and private information, and trick you into unintentionally giving them money.  Attachments such as .zip files are notorious for acting like a Trojan horse to deliver malicious files to your computer.  Make sure you know what you are clicking on at all times.  Just because an e-mail appears to be from a well-known company, don’t assume it is.  Inspect the URL closely for variations in the name, or contact the company by typing in the correct website yourself, or calling them at the number you have on file for them.  A little diligence can go a long way. 

Be sure to “Like” our Pasadenafcu Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, check our PFCUandyou.com blog, and check the Safety and Security tab of our website for info on the latest scams.  Don’t enter personal information such as passwords, social security number, account numbers, answers to security questions and financial information into e-mails you receive.  Go to the website YOU have for the organziation or call them.  E-mails that would ask for information like that are most certainly “phishing” for ways to exploit your trust.  In this case, healthy skepticism can save you headaches and more.

Don’t Let a DDoS Attack Cut You Off From Your Money

DDoS attacks are mentioned more frequently in the news these days, but what are they?  The initials stand for “Distributed Denial of Service” and refer to cyber attacks which are performed by harnessing thousands of personal computers through spyware and malware and instructing them to navigate to a specific website, overloading the server and resulting in the website being inaccessible to legitimate users. 

While there may be any number of motives for such attacks, the goal is to render the targeted website useless for as long as possible.  When there are hints of a pending  attack, it is best to be proactive.  Internet rumors have indicated that a possible large-scale DDoS attack on American financial institutions might occur on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.  As a precaution, anyone who transacts business on financial institution websites is encouraged to refrain from doing so on that day.  Plan ahead and schedule online transactions in advance if possible. If you need to transact on that day, consider physically going to a branch or calling the institution.

Generally, it is not a good idea to wait until the last minute to schedule an online payment or transfer.  Always look ahead and schedule transactions well in advance to give yourself a cushion in the event of unforeseen roadblocks.  You’ll also have peace of mind, which is a great benefit of thoughtful planning.  PFCU’s Online Banking and Bill Pay, for example, allow you to schedule one-time or recurring future payments and transfers and have options for all sorts of convenient reminder texts or e-mails.  The internet is a valuable tool in communication, organization, and information-gathering.  Just be careful not to rely on it to the extent that you can be affected by temporary interruptions in service.  Always have a backup plan.

There are more Safety and Security blog articles here.  To get fraud alerts as soon as we communicate them, “Like” our PasadenaFCU Facebook Page and/or follow us on Twitter @Pasadenafcu.  The Safety and Security tab of our website is a great place to read up on internet safety, too.

Online Fraud Can Come Wrapped in Holiday Bows

Don't let cyber Grinches steal your Christmas cheer

With the success of cyber Monday, more retailers than ever are offering great deals exclusively online.  Unfortunately, many cyber thieves are set to make Santa’s “naughty” list as they prey on unwary, bargain-hunting shoppers with a variety of scams.  Here are some ways you can keep these Grinches from stealing your Christmas:

  • Purchase and install a firewall and anti-virus software before making online purchases.  If you already have protective software, be sure to keep it updated.  You should receive notices when updates are available.
  • Don’t click on links that advertise “free” items, gift cards, holiday gifts or employment.  If interested, go to the website of the company purported to be making the offer (don’t get the web address from the e-mail) and verify the legitimacy of the offer.  If you don’t see the offer, try calling them. 
  • Free cell phone app offers can be tempting, but if you are interested in one you learn about in a text, social media or e-mail, look for it in a recognized App store.
  • Be very careful of electronic greeting cards-they may contain spyware or malware, thus installing trouble on your device in a pretty package!
  • Resist the temptation to click on “Free” offers on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.  If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
  • Follow the safety tips on online auctions like ebay and Craigslist to prevent paying for an item you never receive.
  • It’s wonderful to give to charities at the holidays, but be wary of phone or e-mail solicitations for donations.  You want to ensure that you are actually giving to the charity of your choice and not an imposter.  Look up their website and contact them on your own to arrange a donation. PFCU has dozens of non-profit community partners we work with that would be worthy recipients.  The Federal Trade Commission also has a Charity Checklist.
  • Watch your accounts online for fraudulent activity so you can shut it down quickly.  Our online banking is free and easy to initiate at www.pfcu.org.  You’ll find demos for both Online Banking and Bill Pay. You can even set up text and e-mail alerts so you know right away if specific types of items hit your accounts. 
  • Look for secured sites that have https in the web address.  The “s” stands for “secure” and represents additional security to give you peace of mind. 
  • Check out McAfee’s “Avoid the 12 Scams of the Holidays
  • Bookmark and check frequently the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) Online Security Tips

 

With these tips, your holidays should be “smooth sledding”.  The additional assurance these tips bring will make your holidays much more enjoyable.

Danger: Spiders! Keeping Kids Safe on the Worldwide Web

 

Your kids won't see who is preying on them, so vigilance is imperative

Singer/Songwriter Melissa Manchester has a famous song titled A Mother and Father’s Prayer in which she sings

Would you please take them under wing

Watch over them especially

Keeping them safe from everything

This is a mother’s prayer

 

The world can seem overwhelming for a parent trying to protect their child.  However, being proactive can bring back a feeling of empowerment.  One danger parents may not always consider is the potential harm lurking on the internet.  It is real and has the potential to devastate lives..

A spider weaves elaborate webs to capture unsuspecting creatures so that they can consume them.  While the worldwide web has transformed our lives and placed enormous amounts of information at our fingertips, the comparison of the perilous aspects of its accessibility to a spider’s web is important.  With the freedom of expression and information comes the risk of harm to adults through online fraud scams discussed elsewhere here and to children through online predators.

How can we instill in our kids a confidence and faith in humanity while still protecting them from harm, and even from themselves?  The worldwide aspect of the web means that no single government is able to restrict what people in other countries can post.  Consequently, those who wish to prey upon innocent victims are able to maneuver with alarming ease and can do a lot of damage.  Here are some general rules families should abide by:

  • Think twice before giving kids, even teens,  personal computers with web access in their bedrooms.  They should only be allowed to go online when adults are present and in a shared space such as the living room.  It should be clear that at any time the child’s internet use could be monitored.  Tracking software and parental controls are available.
  • Kids should not be given internet access on cell phones.  Many parents now choose to give their kids mobile phones for emergency and ease of communication between parent and child, but they should not have unfettered access to the internet.
  • Parents should have frequent, ongoing dialogue about the internet with their kids.  The positive attributes of the web should be balanced with detailed explanations of how predators can operate.  Just as kids are taught not to talk to strangers who approach them in public or take candy from them, they should not talk to strangers online.

           

PFCU CFO Robert Norris says he explained to his son that allowing him unmonitored access to the internet would be like placing a stack of adult magazines in his bedroom and asking him not to look at them, and then shutting the door.  “It isn’t fair to him”, he reasoned.

One huge culprit is file-sharing.  In this, the spider is actually spawning many other spiders and they create more webs at an alarming rate, but they all come back to your computer, bringing more hazards!  People love the concept of being able to connect to computers owned by individuals all over the world and quickly gaining access to music, software, images or documents in which they share an interest with others.  Part of the problem lies in the way file-sharing works.  In many cases, you are literally handing control of your computer over to someone else and allowing them to get into all your files, as well as loading anything they want onto your computer.  They can easily upload something illegal onto your database, whether it’s unlawfully acquired intellectual property or even illegal pornographic material.  Once this material is on your computer, it can quickly be shared with others who are connected to the file-sharing network.  This now makes you a distributor of the shared material in the eyes of the law.  One can see how this can quickly become a recipe for disaster. The best way to steer clear of this kind of trouble is to avoid file-sharing sites altogether. 

An article on Kidshealth.org sites the example of a child searching for ‘Lego” and making a typographical error that the search engine auto-corrects to the word ‘legs’.  Now the child may be hit with a barrage of inappropriate images. 

Parental control settings can be a valuable tool but do not rely on them alone. 

Stay involved in your child’s online experience.   The internet can be a wonderful place if approached correctly.  Stay informed and keep your kids informed so that they make the right choices.

Rest assured that PFCU is doing all we can to keep our members safe online. Check out the Kid’s Privacy Policy on our website.  The safety and well-being of our kids is all of our responsibility.

Lyrics from A Mother’s and Father’s Prayer by Melissa Manchester and Karen Taylor-Good

© Copyright 2004 Song Guru Music/Bug/Windswept Music  Used by permission